It speaks about the 2011 rains. My brother and I had traveled to Nainital to study ICOM. When we first arrived, we were amazed to see such a large and stunning lake and we were curious to learn more about it, but we were also concerned because we had not been given a spot in the hostel.

Fortunately, only during the off-season had our parents, Dansingh Bisht (Timber King), set up lodging in the modest hotel Rukari of a relative. This hotel, which the British sold, was located on a hill 3,400 feet above Nainital’s renowned Malroad and lake beach. Next to the hotel’s entryway was a silttrap, a stone building that I imagined was a well.

Prior to that, the rains bring in dry water, and after passing through a sand filter, pure water flows into Nainital. The presence of hundreds of similar silttraps was later discovered. The hotel’s owner, Thakur Saheb of English Para, was a great connoisseur and admirer of the art produced by the British.

It speaks about the 2011 rains. My brother and I had traveled to Nainital to study ICOM. When we first arrived, we were amazed to see such a large and stunning lake and we were curious to learn more about it, but we were also concerned because we had not been given a spot in the hostel.

A little stream emerges from this lake in Tallital. However, it appears that no river that has water for a full year flows into this lake. Thakur Saheb instructed me to visit Sukhiyatal and take a look when I questioned what it was. Sukhiyatal is a lake that is around 4-500 meters long and 300 meters wide, however it only contains sand and gravel outside of the wet season. It is obvious that a lake used to exist there.

The Siran Malli Tal Bazaar in Nainital is one kilometer above this Sukhiyatal, which is located at an elevation of 4-500 feet. There are a few tiny streams that come down from the mountains, like China Peak and Snow View, and a lot of water falls from the slopes during the rainy season. Locals claimed that rainfall enters Nainital from underground and is filtered in this Sukhiyatal.

It is a sizable “desilting basin” created by nature. I distinctly recall Thakur Saheb remarking that the British rescued this dry lake because they recognized its significance. In order to save Sukhiyatal, the British authorities consulted geologists and hydrologist-engineers, and they also constructed hundreds of silttraps elsewhere to prolong Nainital’s existence.

After completing this, it was no longer necessary to create lengthy criteria, such as not to construct structures too far from the lake’s coast in order to restrict tourist. A 12- to 15-foot wide gravel road was constructed to round the lake. A 20/25 feet wide pitch road, 6/7 feet above the Thandi road, was built on the eastern shore of the lake for a distance of around 1.5 kilometers, linking the Mallital bus stop with the apartments near to the Nainadevi temple. Its name is Malrod.

It is a sizable “desilting basin” created by nature. I distinctly recall Thakur Saheb remarking that the British rescued this dry lake because they recognized its significance.

Indians and motor cars were not allowed inside until 1947. A number of large stores, hotels, restaurants, the Capital Reich Theater, and a cinema hall were constructed on the hillside of this road, including London House, Prince, etc. On the lake itself, permission was given to construct a library and boathouse club. There was no pollution and the surroundings was really clean.

After eating paan, people who spit and left trash on the streets were harshly punished. The lake’s surrounding sky water absorption region consisted of a cold road that was only 12–15 feet wide and covered in the same type of gravel as indicated above. Only the President’s and the Governor’s cars were permitted to travel on this mall route, and this restriction persisted even after India attained independence. It was also mentioned that Nehruji once stopped Govindavallabh Pant’s automobile when it attempted to enter Malroad.

On the evening stroll, everyone used to stroll and breathe in the “luft” of Malroad. There could only be hand-pulled rickshaws for the disabled and cycling rickshaws. Even after the introduction of Indian mayors, the regulations and standards established by the British remained in place for a century. The tourism sector saw a sustained boost as a result. A very effective plan for pollution management was also created from the outset.

Everyone used to stroll along the evening walk and enjoy Malroad’s “luft.” Only hand-pulled rickshaws for the disabled and cycle rickshaws were allowed to operate there.

Let’s now talk briefly about Fewatal. Water is not Fewatal’s issue; rather, there is too much of it. The catchments of the Harpan and Khare rivers in Nepal’s Lumle and Panchase areas, known as Cherrapunji, provide the majority of Phewa Lake’s water, with an annual rainfall of 5000 mm (three times the national average). In Pokhara alone, more than 2500 mm of rain fall each year. The landform along the Khare Baje River, a tributary of the Harpan River, is of the alluvial deposit (extremely poor) type according to the geological map. It follows that when there is a flood during the rainy season, there will undoubtedly be a lot of erosion.

Despite the fact that there have been several studies, the area and the Harpan River have not been the subject of in-depth, detailed hydrological or geological research. According to the report produced by the Ministry of Environment and the Japanese Cooperation Mission (JICA) in 2058, between 2.5 million tons of silt and Geiger are dumped into Fewa Lake, and the size of Lake Purii Swamp appears to be growing at a rate of 2 hectares (roughly 40 plants) per year.

No concentrated attempt has been taken to stop this destructive force that is killing the lake, despite the fact that the government has been aware of this report for 22 years. The media and conscientious citizens both haven’t given this any attention. There is a misconception that because the 65 meter requirement has not been applied, this lake would dry up. Citizens who are aware of this reality should be aware of it.

Despite the fact that there have been several studies, the area and the Harpan River have not been the subject of in-depth, detailed hydrological or geological research.

The plan to save the lake was created in 2030 after the Ministry established a rule prohibiting construction up to 200 feet (61 meters) from the lake’s main road. It was later determined that the absorption area of 200 feet (61 meters) around the lake was unnecessary because the Phewa Dam broke in 2031 as a result of heavy rains and floods from Harpankhola.

Due to strong public pressure, the city plan was altered, and this standard was lowered to 66 feet on the lakeside in 2047 and 2048 by the Planning Implementation Committee of the Ministry of Physical Planning and the Urban Development Committee authorized by the Urban Development Act 2045 in 2050. This was done after the purchase of hundreds of plantations in the lake’s sensitive areas and the construction of the park. Evidence of implementation is present.

Following this, the lakeside experienced an unparalleled growth in tourists. No one has been able to demonstrate that anyone did anything to pollute the tourist regions from Lakeside to Khapaundi or fill the lake. After the district development committee requested that the city development committee implement the standard of 65 meters in urban and rural areas in a written letter on April 28, 2064 (without JICA’s recommendation), this committee only decided to recommend to the Ministry of Physical Planning for approval to implement this standard. However, there is no proof of endorsement.

Since the payment of the 50 billion compensation has not yet been determined and this standard is superfluous from the standpoint of the country, the public interest, and based on the opinions of experts, etc., the government decided to reverse its 2064 decision on April 27th, 2068. There is proof that the decision to implement this standard was made on 2069/2/6 by the City Development Committee (the sole authority), in a meeting that included the Chairman and members of the City Development Committee, the CDO, the City Chief, and all other parties.

The meeting of the Pokhara Sub-Metropolitan City Chief, representatives from 4 parties, and associated engineers on April 28, 2069, revealed that the urban development committee had voted to approve the map in accordance with the criteria established by legislation on April 27, 2068. After that, anyone can view the evidence of the numerous building approval letters provided by Pomanpa up until 2075, but the Supreme Court’s 2075 decision issued an order to demolish homes and hotels that had been built illegally within 65 meters using that 2064 decision as the only justification.

To save the lake, Nainital opted for technology and discipline. He has been able to save the lake for more than 100 years and protect it for many more by placing an emphasis on silt control and controlled drainage systems. To save the lake, we have instead chosen to shift culture and standards as mayors and governments come and go.

Nainital decided to use technology and discipline to protect the lake, and by prioritizing silt control and a closed drainage system, it has been able to do so for more than 100 years and will likely be able to do so for thousands of years more. To save the lake, we have instead chosen to shift culture and standards as mayors and governments come and go. Is this enough to save Fevatal?

From: NagarikNews

By itahari network

Itahari Network, Be informed today.

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